What Obama Care Means for Children

Posted on July 9, 2012 at 5:00am by

As you know by now, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Obama’s Affordable Care Act (ACA) earlier this month. While you may not have taken the time to read and digest the entire legislation, there are some significant changes on the way. Under the ACA, insurers can no longer limit or deny benefits or coverage for a child under age 19 with a pre-existing condition.

Before the ACA, health care plans could limit benefits for a child’s pre-existing condition or they could deny coverage entirely. This pertains to health plans at your work and individual health plans issued after March 23, 2010. In addition, this new provision extends to Americans of all ages beginning in 2014.

It does not matter when doctors discovered your child’s sickness or disability under this new provision. Even if doctors discovered or treated the illness before you applied for coverage, your health insurer cannot deny coverage.

This is good news for parents of children with long-term and chronic illnesses. Until now, money for treatment of such illnesses had to come out of the parent’s own pocket if it was a pre-existing condition. Some injuries, such as birth injuries, require long-term treatment and life adjustments for the child and parents.

If your child suffers any type of injury from another person’s careless behavior, contact our office for a free case review. One of our personal injury attorneys is on hand to help you.

Edgar Law Firm – Santa Rosa injury lawyers



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One Response to What Obama Care Means for Children

  1. This is excellent news for children suffering from conditions like cerebral palsy and Erb’s palsy that stem from various forms of birth trauma. These children had no choice in their condition, and they should not be denied medical care because of how they were born. Parents of children with birth trauma disabilities need all the help they can get, and the Affordable Care Act strikes down obstacles that stood in their way for far too long.

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